Memes/References:

Boss Baby Chant

All Your Base Are Belong To Us

Ella Minnow Pea: A Novel in Letters by Mark Dunn



Summary:

When disc jockey Grant Mazzy reports to his basement radio station in the Canadian town of Pontypool, he thinks it’s just another day at work. But when he hears reports of a virus that turns people into zombies, Mazzy barricades himself in the radio booth and tries to figure out a way to warn his listeners about the virus and its unlikely mode of transmission: the English language.



Nerd Corner:

So many different ways we could go: why only spoken language, why ENGLISH, is it about the role of media in disseminating false information, is it especially relevant a decade after it’s release because of the rise of “fake news,” is it inspired by William S. Burroughs and his “language is a virus” thread, etc.

 

What Nerd Corner DID focus on: H.G. Wells serialized novel The War of the Worlds and how it could be read as a critique of British imperialism and colonization, Orson Welles’ adaptation into a radio play, the exaggerations of a widespread panic, and tying that back to the intentional pacing of Pontypool and how Orson Welles adaptation was an inspiration. 



Kate Notes:

The movie opens up with questions around language 

 

A herd* they HEARD it and herded. 

 

If you don’t want people to translate the message you should really start with that. 

 

He’s fjucked by what he heard. 

 

He yelled at her. He’s having trouble believing it. He wants to know if people are messing with him. If it’s a big stunt. She’s just like…no, there’s people dying Kim. 

 

“Leave this situation I brought back in my head.” 

 

She looped it. What a brilliant wench. 

 

The fridge poetry and cherubs. The gore everywhere. Static crackling with “Sydney Briar is alive”

 

Horror Obsessive- Trump era, power of words, danger of words, manipulation through misunderstanding?

 

Connection and deceit, relationship with the listeners, inflammatory rhetoric to get people engaged.

 

Conversationalists 

The history and future of the sequel- the sequel (Typo Chan) has not been released but takes place at the exact same time as 

 

What I want to read into it vs. intention vs. how the message changes over time?

 

Pontypool was released in 2009, based off the novel Pontypool changes everything which was published in 1998.

 

Burgess’s question:

“It all ends up unraveling completely in an attempt to once again answer, ‘What does everything look like when everything changes?’ That, to me, is the constant question in the series.” (Jenkins, 2021)

 

So many people want to know what the original word was. Some folks say Honey. 

“I’ve had endless discussions with people who say, ‘What are the rules of the virus? It’s the most important thing in any zombie or infection movie. You have to have a set of rules which are consistent.’ But that has absolutely nothing to do with the real world! In the real world, viruses break their rules all the time. The people who tell you the nature of those rules don’t actually know them.” (Jenkins, 2021)




Tropes:

All your base are belong to us 

Bread, Eggs, Milk, Squick

For Science!

Morton’s Fork





Scale:

Ventriloquist babies




Works Cited:

Jenkins, Jason. (2021, April 2). Writer Tony Burgess Heads Back to ‘Pontypool’ to Discuss Unmade Sequel ‘Pontypool Changes’ [Phantom Limbs]. Bloody Disgusting. https://bloody-disgusting.com/exclusives/3658548/writer-tony-burgess-heads-back-pontypool-discuss-unmade-sequel-pontypool-changes-phantom-limbs/ 

 

Levin, Robert. (2009, May 31). Review: Pontypool. Film School Rejects. https://filmschoolrejects.com/review-pontypool/ 

 

Memmott, Mark. (2013, October 30). 75 Years Ago, ‘War Of The Worlds’ Started A Panic. Or Did It? NPR. https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2013/10/30/241797346/75-years-ago-war-of-the-worlds-started-a-panic-or-did-it

 

Schwartz, A. Brad. (2015, May 6). The Infamous “War of the Worlds” Radio Broadcast Was a Magnificent Fluke. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/infamous-war-worlds-radio-broadcast-was-magnificent-fluke-180955180/